Some scientists say that the premarital cohabitation effect is not a real phenomenon. However, new research says that Tennessee couples could be impacted by it over the long-term. According to the authors of the study, cohabitation before marriage offers a benefit for the first year of marriage. However, it becomes a factor in whether a couple divorces each year thereafter. Other research concluded that this impact would be negated as cohabitation became more common and accepted.

The study, which was published in the Journal of Marriage and Family in September, also found that divorce may be even more likely for those who had lived with previous partners. According to a Barna Trends 2017 report, 57 percent of those surveyed said that they had lived with a partner or were currently doing so. Furthermore, 65 percent of those surveyed said that they thought that cohabitation was a good idea.

It was noted that those who don’t live together prior to marriage have a greater risk of getting divorced in the short-term. This is because there may be more that needs to be worked out immediately after the marriage becomes official.

Unfortunately, not all marriage vows last a lifetime. When going through a divorce, it may be a good idea to consult with a legal professional. The client could learn more about property division, alimony and child custody laws in the state. An attorney may also provide insight as to how to get financial or other information to gain leverage in settlement talks. Ultimately, legal counsel could help ensure a fair separation agreement.