Tennessee readers might be concerned to learn that Apple’s CarPlay platform reduces the reaction times of drivers more than using marijuana, consuming alcohol or texting does, according to a new study. The study was conducted by researchers at IAM RoadSmart, which is the United Kingdom’s biggest traffic safety charity.

For the study, which was published in March, researchers analyzed the safety impact of certain in-car distractions by placing 20 CarPlay and 20 Android Auto users in a driving simulator and having them drive the same route three times. For the first trip, drivers traveled the route without turning on the infotainment systems. For the second trip, they turned on the infotainment systems’ voice assistant and asked it to complete tasks such as playing music, sending texts, making phone calls and using the navigation controls. For the third trip, they completed the same set of tasks using touch controls. During all three trips, the researchers monitored the drivers’ ability to maintain their speed and stay in their lane. They also tracked the drivers’ gazes and measured their response to various stimuli.

The researchers found that using Apple’s CarPlay voice system slowed down driver reaction times by 36%, which was worse than texting, using Android’s Auto voice system, making a hands-free phone call, driving while high on pot and driving above the legal alcohol limit. Meanwhile, using CarPlay’s touch system slowed down driver reactions times by 57%, which was worse than using Auto’s touch system and making a hand-held phone call. The authors of the study urged Apple and Android to make their systems safer for drivers to use.

Individuals who are injured in distracted driving motor vehicle accidents might be owed compensation for their medical expenses, pain and suffering, lost income and more. Injured victims may learn more about their legal options by contacting a personal injury attorney.